Seattle Office
(206) 225-2882
Everett Office
(425) 337-2400
Seattle Office
(206) 225-2882
Everett Office
(425) 337-2400

The Parent’s Guide to Pediatric Dental Care

pediatric-dental

 

As a parent, you want what’s best for your child. That includes wanting what’s best for your child’s teeth. There are a few questions that you may be asking about pediatric dental care. Whether it’s the age at which you should start taking your child to the dentist or how you should clean his or her teeth, you’ve come to the right place!

 

Does my child need a pediatric dentist?
Pediatric Dentists in Seattle are dental professionals who specialize in oral care for children. There are challenges such as dental development difficulties and pediatric root canals that are best addressed by someone who specializes in caring for children’s teeth. That being said, general dentists are often able to treat children. If you have a dentist who cares for the teeth of your entire family, chances are he or she will be able to treat your child as well. A family dentist will already be acquainted with the history of your family. If you aren’t sure whether you should have your child treated by your general dentist or by a pediatric dentist, consult your family dentist.



When does my child need to start visiting the dentist?
After your son or daughter’s first tooth has started peeking through, schedule a visit in six months. This is about the right time for a dentist to assess the development of your child’s teeth. Dentists are able to treat dental issues and prevent further problems in the past. It isn’t uncommon for dental issues such as bottle tooth decay, teething irritations, and even gum disease to occur while your child is at a young age. Therefore, it’s best to start taking your child to the dentist early on.



Is there anything, in particular, that I need to do to prepare?
Prior to the visit, call the dental clinic and ask about the procedures that will be performed. This allows you to prepare yourself and your child. The most important thing to prepare is your child and his or her reaction. Most children don’t like visiting the dentist. Make sure you talk to your son and daughter often about it. Tell them about the noises and what will be happening. Make it sound like an adventure rather than a chore. That way, the visit will be less distressing for the both of you. Aside from preparing your child, be sure to pack all of his or her medical records to make it easy to fill out the forms before the appointment.



When will my child’s permanent teeth come in?
Most kids are usually around four years old when they start losing their baby teeth. The front teeth usually fall out first. Teeth will continue to fall out until your child is around thirteen years of age when all their permanent teeth have come in.



Why does tooth decay in baby teeth need to be treated if those teeth will fall out anyway?
Baby teeth need to be cared for because the spaces that they currently occupy are the very same spaces that permanent teeth will occupy in the future. In the case that a baby tooth rots or is removed too soon, there may not be enough space for permanent teeth. This is a problem that can only be solved with orthodontic treatment. Decaying baby teeth also weaken the tooth and can result in permanent teeth developing improperly. Repercussions may include permanent enamel defects and weak teeth.



How can I make sure my child maintains good oral health?
You’ll have to take an active role in your child’s oral health during the early years of their life. Your infant’s gums will have to be wiped by a clean, damp cloth. If your dentist gives you the go-ahead, you can put a small amount of children’s toothpaste (fluoride-free) on the cloth as well. When your child’s teeth come in, get them a small, soft toothbrush and help them learn how to brush with a small dab of fluoride toothpaste.

 

You can try making a brushing routine with your child so that you can teach them how to brush their teeth properly. Make a point of brushing well at night. In the evening, your child will have less salivary flow and is more prone to developing cavities and accumulating plaque. It’s important for you to make sure their teeth are clean before they go to bed. After a few years, your child should learn to brush independently. Learning from your example will make a big difference, so make sure you brush up on your oral hygiene as well!

Icon Dental Center is a dental office in Seattle, if you’re looking for a new local dentist in Seattle, come to visit us today!

FREE LYFT SERVICE